Travel Trailer or Motorhome?

Travel Trailer or Motorhome?

So you entered your local RV dealership with a crystal clear picture in your mind of what your first motorhome would look like. Two hours later, however, you walked out confused, trying to sort out all the new terms you’ve heard. What’s the difference between a Class A motorhome and a Class C? And how are they different from travel trailers? More importantly, which one is best for you?

This article has been designed to break down each type of RV to help you determine which best fits your lifestyle.

Class A

Imagine your house. Now put a steering wheel in it. You’re looking at a Class A motorhome. Class A motorhomes are built on a bus chassis, and therefore can be more than 40 feet long, include any imaginable amenity, and tow a small car, or a “toad,” behind them. Once the motorhome is parked, the driver and passenger seats can be turned around and used for living room furniture. Class A motorhomes are the largest and therefore most expensive RV options.  

Class B

Because Class B motorhomes are built on a van chassis, they are extremely easy to handle on the road. While Class Bs are the shortest motorhomes on the road, they feature a raised roof for larger living quarters and get great gas mileage.

Class C

Class C motorhomes are built on a truck chassis. These motorhomes feature an extra sleeping area over the driver’s cab, making Class Cs attractive for large families. If you are looking for a less-expensive motorhome with the ability to tow a boat or car, a Class C may be the best fit for you.  

Fifth Wheel/Travel Trailer

A fifth wheel and a travel trailer similar, yet serve two different types of audiences. Fifth wheels hitch in the bed of a truck and can be as large and luxurious as a traditional motorhome. Travel trailers, on the other hand, can be towed by trucks, vans or sometimes even heavy cars. Fifth wheels are generally more expensive than travel trailers but more affordable than motorhomes. For families who already own a large truck or are looking for more luxurious travel accommodations, a fifth wheel may work better. For families who require less living space or want to use their own car or van for travel and storage, on the other hand, a travel trailer may best fit their lifestyle.  

Camper/Pop-up Trailers

Pop ups and campers are smaller and cheaper than most other travel options. Pop up trailers can be towed flat, then expanded at a campsite. Campers are so small that they can be slid into the bed of a pickup truck. Both campers and pop-up trailers make excellent startup trailers for small families of one to three people who happen to be weekend warriors rather than full-time campers.  

This article has been presented by RV World,  a Florida RV dealership with lots in both Nokomis and Lakeland.

jockson is an expert in the field of Rv world and has written various articles on that. To know more RV World, Florida RV dealership.

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