RV Holding Tank Maintenance

This is a subject that seems to baffle a lot of people.  There are hundreds of products and methods on the market to help take you money because no one ever taught us how to use the holding tanks in our RVs.  So with a little time and effort I hope to shine some light on this problem and the solution.

The tanks in your RV is a holding tank not a septic system.  It is a plastic bucket with three holes in it.  One to allow stuff into the tank, one for a vent that goes to the roof of the RV and another that leads to a valve for draining.  Kind of simple.  There are various methods of providing a indication as to the level of fluids in the tank.  None of them are very reliable, mainly because we don’t do our part to maintain the cleanliness of the tank.

Operations of the these holding tanks is also pretty simple.  You dump stuff into the tanks and when full dump them.  Now for the had part.  There are methods all over the place and advice that will differ from just about everybody.   But the simple truth is these are HOLDING tanks.  That mean they are designed to hold the stuff we put in them until dumped.  What I mean is KEEP THE VALVES CLOSED!  Notice I have not talked about grey or black tanks.  This is for a reason.  The processes and procedures are the same.  Keep the valves closes.  You would be surprised at the amount of food, hair, and other stuff that collects in the bottom of the grey holding tank because people think it all flows out the drain.  IT DOESN’T, it sits in the tank and collects and over time starts to rot and smell.  Since there is no method of flushing it out with a wand for example, it stays there, forever!

When do you flush the tanks?  This is an excellent question.  The answer is so simple, when they are full.  You will quickly learn when the tanks are full.  They have a habit of filling up when you take a shower and the water backs up, when you are washing dishes and the shower starts to back up, when you use the toilet and the water burbs at you and the room starts to smell.  Then it is time to dump the tanks.  But what do you do if at the end of a camping trip your tanks need to be dumped and they are not full?  Fill them!  Flush water down the toilet until it is full, dump water down the sinks until it is full.  Just consider this as one of the tasks of breaking camp.

Before we get into the procedures I want to talk about another tip.  Get a clear plastic sewer hose attachment for connecting two hoses together.  Place it somewhere in the sewer line that is easy to watch.  This way you can see when the tank has emptied completely.  It will also aid in letting you know when you rinse the tank if it is clean or not.

DSC_0086

Now to dump the tanks.  Start with opening the black tank valve first.  Let it dump completely.  You will see when it is done in the clear section of the sewer hose.  If you have a black tank flush system, now is the time to use it.  Follow the manufactures recommendations.  Most of the ones I have seen say that the tank valve must be open when using.  This just prevents Mr Murphy from helping you create a Robin Williams RV moment (If you haven’t watched the movie RV, do so).  When the water runs clean, turn off the black tank flush.  If you do not have a black tank flush, use your toilet.  Fill the bowl and dump it until the water runs clean.  This could take a while when you first start as there could be all kinds of crap in the tank that has to be flushed out.

Once you have dumped and cleaned the black holding tank, close the valve and put a few gallons of water into the tank.  Fill and flush the toilet about 4 times.  This will put enough water in the tank to help keep things from getting hard as the RV sits until the next trip.

Now open the valve(s) to the grey holding tanks.  Wait for the tank(s) to drain.  Unlike the black tanks there isn’t an easy way to flush the tanks.  There are some attachments you can use, that connect to the dump station that allow you to close off the sewer line, connect water hose to the connector and back flush the tanks.  I have used one called King Flush that I like, but there are others out there.  The point is, you want the water coming out of the tank running clear.  Close the valve and again put a couple of gallons of water into the grey tank to keep things from getting hard while it sits.

One more tip, if you are one that wants or has to have the grey tank open when you are camping, make sure you put a dip in the sewer hose.  This will act as a p-trap and keep the sewer gases out of your RV.

p-trap

It works by keeping a little water in the lower part of the hose so gases and bugs can’t come up from the campground sewer system.

Hope you have had a great Memorial Day Weekend.  Say a prayer for our fallen Heros.

 

Making Life Easier

One of the great debates for folks that RV is Tow Bar vs Tow Dolly.  I am not going to go there.  But there is a point to be made that tow bars are easier to connect and don’t have the weight issues that a tow dolly does.  We have a tow dolly mainly because of the cost to convert and the age of our car.  With the wife and I working at it we are usually connected in under 10 minutes.  We each have our own tasks to perform and it works well for us.  One of the biggest issue we have come across over the last year of full timing is the weight and moving the dolly around.  It weighs around 450-550 lbs and I think a good bit of that is on the tongue.  So dragging it around and hooking up can be quite tiring for the older folks.

I have often thought that a wheeled jack on the tongue would make the job easier.  Well this week while we are at Gettysburg Farm in Pennsylvania, we saw someone that had done just that.  He added a swing down jack to his Master Tow car dolly.  I sat and talked to him and after a few minutes, decided that we should do the same thing.  I found the parts at a local RV Store but Camping World had them as well.  The swing down jack cost me about $40 and handles 1000 lbs.  The tongue on the dolly was about 3 inches maybe a little more and the jack would work on 3 to 5 inch tongues.  It took maybe 30 minutes to connect it and tighten down the bolts.  MAN what a difference it makes moving the dolly around.  Now what use to take both the wife and I to do, I can easily do it my self.  Instead of being bent over trying to hold up a couple hundred pounds and move it around, I just wheel it around with ease.  Here are a few pictures of the finished project.

Swing Down Jack 1

Swing Down Jack 2

Swing Down Jack 3

Run Flat Tire Inserts

I was sitting here trying to decide what the topic for this week would be and surfing the web, when I found  a video about an RV that had a blow out while traveling at highway speeds.  Everyone was fine, but the rig and toad were destroyed.

In the military our Hummers had these things called “Run Flat” inserts.  The idea was that a metal band inside the tire would prevent it from going flat due to sudden lost of air pressure.  Our 2007 Safari Simba has them installed as well.  I found this out when we had to have a valve stem replaced.  The tech did nothing but complain about them as it added time and work to his already busy day.

Run Flat Image for website article.

The way these work is as long as there is air pressure in the tires the thread is kept off the insert.  As the pressure decreases the tire collapses onto the insert but does not collapse all the way.  Preventing loss of control until you can pull over safely.  Now there is a problem here.  Because there is no loss of control, the driver may not realize the issue and continue driving.  This leads to excess friction and damage to the tire until it either comes apart or begins to burn.  Both of which can cause damage to the RV.

The solution is to add a tire pressure and temperature monitoring system to the RV as well.  But that is another article.  Finding these might be  a problem.  However, the cost I think is well worth the peace of mind.  My search of the web shows that the cost should be around $300 for two tire inserts.

 

Braking Distances

I am sitting here drinking my morning coffee and thinking about what the subject should be for this weeks article.  As you know I have posted a lot of things on here about inspecting and lately about the maintenance.  But today a post on the web got me thinking that most of us have no idea how to safely drive our rigs.  Face it, we spend most of our time in a car or light truck and then when we want to go camping, we just behind the wheel and off we go.  We have gone from a 4 wheel 2000 lbs vehicle to as many wheels as an 18 wheeler with weights approaching 40,000 and maybe more.  Some of these are air brake equipped just like the big rigs.  Then we hit the road and maintain speed with everyone else and the following distances just like a car.

So I started to do some research on braking distance in an RV.  First some perspective.  A car traveling at 60 MPH takes about 200 ft to stop.  That is according to a couple of posts  I found the average big rig takes about 40 percent longer to stop than a car.  So the Class A’s should take about 280 feet to stop.  This does not include the reaction time which is another 1 to 1.5 secs.  At 60 MPH that is up to another 135 feet or more than a football field.  All totaled the car will stop in about the football field from the time the driver see the problem until the vehicle is stopped where as the RV will take almost 1.4 football fields to stop.

So basically, you need to slow down and increase the distance between you and the vehicle in front.  If someone pulls in front of you, remember that you still need over a football field to stop and it will take 135 feet before your foot is even on the brake to think about stopping.

Camping is not about the race to get there, it is about relaxing and enjoying life.  Start the camping trip when you leave home and relax and enjoy the trip.