Travel Trailer or Motorhome?

Travel Trailer or Motorhome?

So you entered your local RV dealership with a crystal clear picture in your mind of what your first motorhome would look like. Two hours later, however, you walked out confused, trying to sort out all the new terms you’ve heard. What’s the difference between a Class A motorhome and a Class C? And how are they different from travel trailers? More importantly, which one is best for you?

This article has been designed to break down each type of RV to help you determine which best fits your lifestyle.

Class A

Imagine your house. Now put a steering wheel in it. You’re looking at a Class A motorhome. Class A motorhomes are built on a bus chassis, and therefore can be more than 40 feet long, include any imaginable amenity, and tow a small car, or a “toad,” behind them. Once the motorhome is parked, the driver and passenger seats can be turned around and used for living room furniture. Class A motorhomes are the largest and therefore most expensive RV options.  

Class B

Because Class B motorhomes are built on a van chassis, they are extremely easy to handle on the road. While Class Bs are the shortest motorhomes on the road, they feature a raised roof for larger living quarters and get great gas mileage.

Class C

Class C motorhomes are built on a truck chassis. These motorhomes feature an extra sleeping area over the driver’s cab, making Class Cs attractive for large families. If you are looking for a less-expensive motorhome with the ability to tow a boat or car, a Class C may be the best fit for you.  

Fifth Wheel/Travel Trailer

A fifth wheel and a travel trailer similar, yet serve two different types of audiences. Fifth wheels hitch in the bed of a truck and can be as large and luxurious as a traditional motorhome. Travel trailers, on the other hand, can be towed by trucks, vans or sometimes even heavy cars. Fifth wheels are generally more expensive than travel trailers but more affordable than motorhomes. For families who already own a large truck or are looking for more luxurious travel accommodations, a fifth wheel may work better. For families who require less living space or want to use their own car or van for travel and storage, on the other hand, a travel trailer may best fit their lifestyle.  

Camper/Pop-up Trailers

Pop ups and campers are smaller and cheaper than most other travel options. Pop up trailers can be towed flat, then expanded at a campsite. Campers are so small that they can be slid into the bed of a pickup truck. Both campers and pop-up trailers make excellent startup trailers for small families of one to three people who happen to be weekend warriors rather than full-time campers.  

This article has been presented by RV World,  a Florida RV dealership with lots in both Nokomis and Lakeland.

jockson is an expert in the field of Rv world and has written various articles on that. To know more RV World, Florida RV dealership.

How To Select A 5th Wheel Camper

One of the most popular types of recreational vehicles is the 5th wheel camper. A 5th wheel camper allows for a separate camper, or trailer, to be towed along by just about any pickup truck or sports utility vehicle.

The 5th wheel camper is attached to the pickup truck through what is known as a fifth wheel coupling. This type of coupling is link between the camper and the towing pickup truck or sports utility vehicle.

The way this works is through the coupling pin, also known as a king pin, on the front of the camper and a horseshoe-shaped coupling hitch, also known as the fifth wheel, on the back end of the pickup truck or sports utility vehicle.

The use of a 5th wheel camper allows for camping enthusiasts to spend time with their friends and family, perhaps some of which do not really enjoy the idea of roughing it out in the wilderness. A 5th wheel camper, one of the most popular recreational vehicles, can offer all the comforts of home while out on the campsite.

To of the line 5th wheel campers offer air conditioning or heat, bathrooms with working toilets and showers, kitchens with working refrigerators, stoves, and ovens, satellite television, and some even have Internet connections available. Many RV parks today offer full hook ups for gas, propane, water, and electricity for such 5th wheel campers.

Many families choose to invest in a 5th wheel camper simply to save the time and energy of booking flights, worrying about hotels and accommodations, and food. While it is true that a 5th wheel camper can range in cost from $ 20,000 and $ 40,000 on average, in the long run, it can save a lot of money if the family chooses to travel a great deal.

Other than monetary reasons, a 5th wheel camper is a great way to spend quality time with the family on extended road trips. A 5th wheel trailer allows for a family to not only all enjoy a camping trip, but to enjoy each other as well.

Many families opt to take the 5th wheel camper out for the summer holidays and travel all along the country, to see the sights, and visit different nature reserves, parks, or RV resorts. This type of traveling can allow for plenty of learning about different areas and a chance to see almost every type of land within the United States.

There is no shortage of companies offering the 5th wheel camper for sale. Many companies have been in operation since the 1960s (or before) when camping and recreational vehicles began to grow in popularity.

Today, these manufacturers compete for customers by developing and designing fuel efficient and comfortable 5th wheel campers that are based on top-quality construction and engineering, design, and customer service. Some of these companies include Jayco Campers, Coleman Campers, Fleetwood Campers, Coachmen Campers, Bigfoot, and Alaskan.

Each of these manufacturers offer a variety of campers in addition to the 5th wheel camper, including the fold-down camper, motorhomes, and toy haulers. Do a little comparison shopping to decide which model and brand is best for you.

Find The Top 5th Wheel Camper’s at Pop-Up-Camper.com [http://www.pop-up-campers.com/5th-wheel-camper.php].

Article Source:
http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Jack_Harmon/37645

Recreational Vehicles

Recreational vehicles are multipurpose vehicles that are used for various purposes ranging from travelling and camping to full time living (for which they are parked in special trailer parks). Recreational vehicles are also widely known as mobile homes or motor homes. It is important to weigh both costs and benefits of owning and even renting a recreational vehicle because a rash or careless decision can cost you a substantial amount of money. Discounts recreational vehicles are available both for purchase and renting. Recreational vehicles, whether rented or owned offer various benefits some of which are; you don’t have to sit between two obese people in a plane, train or bus, you don’t have to unpack on reaching your destination, ignoring the initial costs recreational vehicles help you save both cost of travelling and lodging and you have ample space and privacy of a room along with a private bathroom.

Types of Recreational Vehicles

There are various types of recreational vehicles to choose from if you are thinking to rent or buy one. Some of the most common types are discussed below:

Pop up – Pop up is a type of recreational vehicle that can accommodate two to eight people and is basically a tent on wheels. Having a stove top and sink and storage compartments it is much more convenient than conventional tent camping. Most experts recommend a pop up if you are about to purchase your first recreational vehicle. Pop ups are affordable for most people with prices of new pop ups ranging from $ 4,000 to $ 8,000 and second hand pop ups ranging between $ 2,000 to $ 5,000, depending on condition and age.

Truck Camper – Truck camper is one of the most popular types of recreational vehicles that can be detached from a truck which can be your mode of transport on days on which you don’t plan on camping. Different models of truck campers are available varying in design, functionality and quality depend largely on your budget and needs. New truck campers cost somewhere between $ 8,000 to $ 22,000 (excluding the truck). Price of second hand truck campers range between $ 1,000 to $ 8,000 depending on age, quality and depreciation.

Class B – Class B is a type of recreational vehicles that includes fancy vans having full-sized motor homes that are more comfortable and luxurious the two types mentioned above. Most class B recreational vehicles include amenities such as shower (in some models), toilet, kitchen, TV, fridge, couches and beds. Prices of class B recreational vehicles range from $ 33,000 to $ 55,000 for new ones and $ 5,000 to $ 15,000 for used ones depending on age, mileage and depreciation.

Class C – Also known as the mini-motor homes class C recreational vehicles are smaller than full size motor homes yet offer most or all the advantages of motor homes. Accommodating between three to six people, class C recreational vehicles cost anywhere between $ 46,000 to $ 65,000 for new ones and $ 5,000 to $ 20,000 for used ones depending on depreciation, age, mileage, amenities and brand.

Class A – Class A recreational vehicles is a type of recreational vehicles that is ideal for serious RVers. Class A recreational vehicles are spacious, comfortable and luxurious and cost an arm and a leg. They are most popular with retired couples and cost between $ 50,000 to $ 500,000 and $ 8,000 to $ 200,000 for new and used class A recreational vehicles depending on make, size, amenities, age and depreciation.

This article is written by Annie. She works for AllBestCars and also managing Xjeem (http://www.xjeem.com).

Article Source:
http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Annie_Mal/181461

Tip for a Smooth Silicone Patch

All RVers from time to time need to patch up something with Silicone or RTV.  Today, I had to redo the caulking around the kitchen sink.  It was a simple job, but I learned a new trick which I thought I would pass on to the folks that read this blog.

I started with a razor knife and cleaned out all the old sealant, making sure that I got into the crack all the way around the sink.  I also scrapped off any residue that was left over.  I had an old tube of silicone left over from patching a window, which was still good.  So, I laid a thin bead around the sink.  So far, nothing earth shattering.  The trick I learned was to spray the bead with Windex (with Ammonia).  Then with a wad of paper towels handy, I ran my finger over the bead, pushing it into the joint and creating a smooth seal.  Every few inches I wiped my figure on the towel.  First surprise was that nothing stuck to my figure.  Second surprise was I got a great looking seal.

 

Next week I have to reseal both the drivers side and passenger side windows.  I may make this one into a video, not sure yet.  At the very least I will take pictures of the process.

Tax Season Special

Tax season is upon us and with the refunds many of you will be looking at buying a new RV.  To help make that purchase easier, I am offering for a limited time and limited number of people a 50% discount on the total order from the book store.  This will be available to the first 50 people and expires on April 15, 2016.

To receive the discount, select the books and check lists you want to order and at check out use the coupon code :  NW32016.

RV Recalls

I pulled this information from Passport America Newsletter.

Three manufacturers issued recalls that will affect more than 9,000 RVs, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Forest River, which reported a recall of 1,734 Shasta units last week, recalled 5,374 of its 2009-16 Forest River Cherokee and Vengeance RVs due to an insufficient ground wire for the wiring harness supplying power to the trailers’ lights, electric brakes, battery charging and interior 12V fixtures.

With an insufficient ground wire, the wiring harness may overheat, increasing the risk of fire. Additionally, the ground wire failure would result in the loss of the trailer’s external lights and electric brakes.

Forest River will notify owners, and dealers will inspect the trailer wiring harnesses, and upgrade the ground wires, as necessary. The recall is expected to begin Nov. 18.

Owners may contact Forest River’s customer service number at 1-260-593-4005. Forest River’s recall number is 17B-0918-2015-0090.

Keystone RV recalled 3,585 of its 2008-09 Big Sky, Challenger, Everest, Fuzion, Montana and Raptor travel trailers and fifth wheels due to a faulty transfer switch.

The switch, an IOTA ITS-50R, was used in vehicles wired for generator power, may fail when exposed to high electrical loads or elevated temperatures, increasing the risk of fire.

Keystone will notify owners, and dealers will replace the IOTA ITS-50R transfer switch with a different brand transfer switch. The recall is expected to begin today (Oct. 5). Owners may contact Keystone customer service by calling 1-866-425-4369. Keystone’s number for this recall is 15-234.

Spartan Motors is recalling 550 of its 2010-13 Spartan K3 and MM motor home chassis due to a flexible exhaust tube that may tear, allowing hot exhaust to blow against other components or materials.

Spartan will notify owners, and dealers will replace the flexible exhaust tube with an improved one. The recall is expected to begin in September. Owners may contact Spartan customer service at 1-517-543-6400. Spartan’s number for this recall is 15020.

TPMS Part 2

The installation of the TPMS involves, charging the unit (if required), coding the monitors to the location, mounting the monitors and then testing the configuration.  Total time, including reading the manuals was less than an hour.

My monitor came with a full charge.  Otherwise the manual says to plug it in for 15 minutes or so.  Speaking of which, read the manual.  You need to understand what you will be doing before you do it.  Some steps are time sensitive and the unit will reset if you don’t complete them in time.  Don’t worry, once you understand what has to be done, you have plenty of time to do it.

Kit 1

Kit 2

When you get your TPMS it has two sections of parts.  The top layer has the sensors and the monitoring unit.  The lower section has the instructions, mounting brackets, power cords, tools, screws, caps and mounting hardware for the monitor.

Setup is pretty simple.  You lay the sensor (one at a time) next to the monitor, press a button and it maps the sensor to the tire location.  Repeat for all of the tires.  All total this takes maybe 5 minutes.  This is an important step.  Placing a sensor on the wrong tire will give you a false reading.

After the sensors are configured, the system wants you to set up the alarm points.  High and low pressure are first based on each tire location.  This was the hardest section to do for me.  I had no idea what to set the high pressure at.  Low pressure was easy, I set it at 10 lbs below normal pressure.  I ended up looking at the tire side wall and finding the maximum pressure rating for the tire and added 10 lbs.  I left the temperature setting at 158 degrees F which was suggested in the manual.  You also select C or F.

Next you have to mount the sensors on each tire based on where they were recorded.  This takes some time as you also have to secure the sensor once mounted.  Security is an allen set screw.  In my case several of them were not able to be tightened and I had to remove them and put the set screw on the other side.  Each sensor has two locations for the set screw.  Of course Murphy dictated that over half of the set screws where on the wrong side.  You may also want to have a bottle of soap and water to make sure there are no air leaks.  My first tire had to use an extender (which I happen to have had laying around).  Of course the extender was bad and I had to use another one.  Another sensor wasn’t on tight and was leaking a little air.  Without the soap and water that tire would have gone flat.

Tire 1 Installation... problem tire

Tire 1 with the extender.

Tire 2 Installation

Tire 2 no extender needed.

With all of the sensors mounted, turn on the unit and wait, and wait and wait.  It takes about 15 minutes for the monitor to read all of the sensors.  As it finds a sensor it will display the pressure and temperature.  I knew from my pre-trip inspections that it was time to fill a couple of tires.  So I wasn’t surprised to see the tire pressure readings when the system had initialized.  The readings where close to what I got with a tire pressure gauge.   The sensors even showed a difference in temperature from the sun and shade effects.

Alarmed Low Pressure on Trailer

Shows an alarm for low pressure on trailer (different pressure settings)

Monitoring

Shows alarm condition for RV tire.  This was an inside rear tire reading in the shade.

Overall, I am happy with this setup.  It will save me some time on my inspections as well as peace of mind while traveling.  The alarms are hard to see and I will have my wife watch them along with the GPS and other co-pilot tasks.

The one complaint I have is that it takes 15 minutes or so after the unit powers up to find and register all of the tire sensors.  So this will become part of our pre-trip inspection which is done the day before we leave.  I normally check tire pressure prior to pulling out, but with this taking so long, it will be done the day before.

TPMS Installation

Today I received my tire pressure monitoring system from TST.  This article is about the installation process.  I ordered extra tire monitors for the tow dolly.  I did not order monitors for the car.

Part of my pre-departure inspection is to check tire pressure.  I wanted to add the TPMS to make sure we were aware of issues that happen while driving.  Granted I will be able to cut this one step out of the inspection, but the TPMS will add a level of comfort knowing that if there is a problem with the tires we should be made aware of it prior to a major issue.

I chose the TST model for a few reasons.  Our rig came with a TPMS from another company that did not have replaceable batteries and you had to remove them to check the pressure or fill the tires.  I wanted a unit that had replaceable batteries and that you could add air without removing the monitors.  In addition, I wanted to be able to monitor the tire temperature as this is often an indication of a problem before the tire blows.  I ordered my from Amazon as they had the best prices and I am a Prime member so shipping was free.

Continued in next article

 

Nitrogen vs Air in RV Tires

Tires do not carry the load of the RV.  That is a pretty bold statement isn’t it.  But it is true, it is the pressure in the tires that carries the load, the tire just provides the container for the pressure.  Proper pressure in the tire ensures that the load will be carried as required along with increasing the durability of the tire and contributing to fuel economy.

Compress air has been used for decades in tires.  It is cheap or free to use and is widely available at gas stations, tire stores and repair shops.  So why would we want to change?  Compress air often comes at a price that is not related to the cost of the air we put into our tires but to the damage that the air does.

Damage you say?  What damage?  Compressed air that you get at your local service station contains varying degrees of moisture and oil depending on the compressor and relative humidity.  Air also contains Oxygen which along with the humidity causes corrosion and oxidation.  The compressor oil and other contamination that the compressor puts into the condense air causes the rubber in our tires to break down.

Nitrogen on the other hand has a lot of benefits. First it is a dry gas.  Which means it does not support moisture that contributes to corrosion.  Next it reduces the loss of tire pressure due to loss through the rubber. Third, since we have removed oxygen from the tire and the moisture we reduce the corrosion within the tire assembly.

Both Nitrogen and air filled tires will change their pressure as the temperature increases or decreases, but they are basically the same amount (1 PSI/10 degrees F.).  So both should be checked in the morning before driving any distance.

How can you tell if your tires have been filled with Nitrogen?  The caps on the valve stems will be green.  But what if you need to add pressure to nitrogen filled tires and there isn’t some place close by, what should you do?  The primary factor here is the pressure in the tires.  Remember it is the pressure that is carrying the load. So if the pressure drops below the amount required to carry the load, fill the tires to the proper pressure with air if that is the only thing available.  When you can, have the tire recharged with nitrogen to maintain the benefits.

Maintaining the roof of the RV

Last week, I talked about cleaning the roof of the RV.  This week it will be inspecting and doing minor repairs of the roof.  Again, caution should be the word of the day.  If your rig does not have an attached ladder, do not climb on the roof, use a ladder to work your way around the roof as you inspect.

First we are going to look for any obvious signs of damage to the roof. If you have used water to clean the roof, look for any puddles where the water pools.  These are signs of potential issues and should be watched.  Sitting water has time to work its way into the roof even with very minor pin holes. You also want to look for any damaged or pealing sealant around the vents, antennas, fans and air conditioners.  Any place where there is a whole through the roofing material.

What to do if you find or suspect an area that should be patched.  First using the information from last week, make sure you know what kind of roofing material you have.  For the most part EDPM and Fiberglass will use the same materials.  You have the choice of tape or sealer.

Eternabond is a tape like product that is used to seal tears and cracks.  The only negative is that it can not be used over silicone.  So if you have any places that you used silicone to seal, it will have to be removed prior to applying the EternaBond tape.  EternaBond is available in widths up to 36 inches so it can be used to cover a large area.

Another product that can be use is a liquid sealer.  The most common type is a self leveling sealer that spreads out as you pour it.  This naturally is not good for areas around the edge of the rig as it will slide off the roof.  But for the flat areas it is good.  Use this sealer when you have openings where cables or holes that go through the roof.  EternaBond would have problems sealing these areas.

For metal roof repair you can use Quick-Roof.  This is similar to the EternaBond in that you peal off the backing and lay down a smooth flat piece (in this case aluminum paper).

Home inspections for the RV

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